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Boxwood & Boxwood Substitutes Compare
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Green Mountain
Green Mountain Boxwood (Buxus x ‘Green Mountain’) is an extremely popular boxwood. It has great cold tolerance and is one of the most naturally resistant to Boxwood Blight. It is deer and rabbit resistant and grows well in full sun to shade. It is hardy in USDA Zones 4-9.
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Schmidt
Schmidt Boxwood (Buxus sempervirens ‘Schmidt’) is a lesser-known boxwood variety but has a desirable tall and narrow growth habit making it great for hedging. It is deer resistant and grows in full sun to partial shade. It is hardy in USDA Zones 5-8.
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Box Honeysuckle
Box Honeysuckle (Lonicera nitida) is lovely hedge in its own right but also makes a great boxwood substitute for areas with Boxwood Blight. The foliage is evergreen and very similar to boxwood. It is deer resistant, takes full sun to full shade, and grows in USDA Zones 6-9.
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Hick's Yew
Hicks Yew (Taxus x media ‘Hicksii’) is the best hedge for deep shade locations, although it also thrives in full sun. This is a naturally narrow plant, so it is good for small spaces. It has evergreen needles and bright red fruits. Hicks Yew is hardy to USDA Zones 5-8.
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Little Simon
Little Simon Arborvitae (Thuja occidentalis ‘Little Simon’) is a dwarf selection of Emerald Green that only reaches 3-4’ tall. It is a great boxwood substitute for colder regions and blight-susceptible areas. It grows best in full sun and is hardy in USDA Zones 3-8.
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Teton Firethorn
Teton Firethorn (Pyracantha ‘Teton’) is an evergreen hedge that boasts billows of white flowers in spring, followed by bright orange fruits that feed birds through winter. Sharp thorns keep deer away. It grows well in full sun to shade and is hardy in USDA Zones 6-9.
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Sizes
Our hedges come in multiple, convenient sizes. Learn about which hedge size option will work best for your project, from our 18-24” tall MiniHedge to our 5-6’ tall InstantHedge. See detailed dimensions for all of our different hedge sizes, including root balls.
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Containers
You have multiple options for the kind of container in which your InstantHedge is shipped. Learn about our standard Biodegradable Cardboard Boxes, as well as the fabric bag and cedar box options. This page will lead you to the best choice for your project.
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Installation
InstantHedge is a unique product and the planting process is very unlike installing a traditional hedge. This page takes you step by step through the easy process of how to plant an InstantHedge. No doubt about it, it’s the fastest way to plant a hedge.
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About Us
Learn about our company’s past and present, and all about how we introduced this revolutionary product to the US market. You can also get a peek at our farm and meet our team of hedge experts who make all the hedge magic happen!
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Distributors
Find out where you can purchase our hedges in your area, whether you are a retail or wholesale buyer. We have exclusive wholesale distributors in some states, and this is where you can connect with them.
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Projects
See real-life examples of our hedges being used in projects all over the country. These photos are provided by our customers and can be used as inspiration for a wide range of uses, from commercial to residential. You can find customer reviews here as well.
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FAQ
Got questions? Of course you do! And chances are, many others have had the same questions. We know that with an unusual product like our hedges there are always many questions. We answer some common questions here on this FAQ page, so it’s a great place to start.
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Hedge Variety
3-4’, 4-5’, and 5-6’ Field-Grown InstantHedge (available sizes will vary):
18-24” Container-Grown MiniHedge:
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FERTILIZING HEDGES

Home> Posts> Care Guides> FERTILIZING HEDGES

FERTILIZING HEDGES

When planting a hedge, there are a few things that should be done with the soil to ensure the hedge has a long, healthy life.

Unless the native soil is rich, balanced, nutrient-dense, and well-draining to begin with, soil enhancements such as compost or lime might be needed before planting.

best fertilizer for hedges

Applying mulch directly after planting and again once every year or two will help conserve moisture, reduce weeds, and insulate roots from heat and cold. As it decomposes it will further enrich the soil. We recommend a mulch made of organic materials such as fine bark or straw.

fertilizing hedges

For years ahead, applying a slow-release fertilizer is an integral part of maintaining a lush, thriving hedge. A vigorous, healthy hedge is more resistant to pests and diseases, and supplying the proper application of fertilizer will help with this.

Best hedge fertilizer
  • To maximize the health of the plant, choose a fertilizer for the specific variety used. We typically use different fertilizers for deciduous and evergreen hedges.
  • A slow-release fertilizer is always recommended. These fertilizers ‘release’ their elements over time, allowing the plant to absorb the fertilizer more effectively.
  • Slow-release fertilizers tend to promote much more even growth, making it excellent for hedges, which benefit from height and width uniformity.
  • Slow-release fertilizer significantly minimizes the likelihood of fertilizer burn.
  • Fertilizers are easily applied using drop spreaders and broadcast spreaders: the former releases fertilizers in targeted locations, which is more precise, while the latter spreads fertilizers on a larger scale, which is faster. For small properties, application by hand is also a great option.
  • We recommend a 6-7 month slow release fertilizer for most climates. Apex makes a 16-5-9 slow release 6-7 month release, which works great for our hedge varieties. In the Pacific Northwest, you can use a longer-release fertilizer of 8-9 months. For longer release, Osmocote Blend 18-5-12 is a great choice. Any fertilizers with similar blends (the numbers indicate the ratio of Nitrogen-Phosphorus-Potassium and are standard regardless of brand) and release times (6-7 months in most areas) to the ones mentioned above are suitable. Apply the fertilizer at the manufacturer’s recommended rate.
Soil maintenance is easy to overlook, but it is critical for successfully growing any kind of plant. Our hedges are very low-maintenance, but these simple soil-building steps can make a huge difference in the health and longevity of your hedge. Check out our other Care Guides to learn how to plant hedges, water hedges, and how to prune hedges to grow fuller. Different hedge varieties require different care, but these guides give you some great general information about how to grow hedges.
By |2020-08-07T23:47:51+00:00January 18th, 2019|Care Guides|